Shrink Wrapping Homes

As I discussed in the previous blog, there can be issues when a home becomes vacant and no one is around to maintain the property. Any millions of things can happen, but commonly, homes can become infested with insects or rodents, mold and mildew can grow dangerously fast, algae blossoms can overtake un-drained pools, creepy disoriented men can burrow in the living room and may or may not choose to use the toilet when they have to go to the bathroom. Even worse than a vacant home, is an uncompleted home, which is obviously far more exposed to the elements and potential squatters.  Sometimes, banks might figure it’s not worth the cost to maintain and sell unfinished properties; especially if the property is in a depressed area. Instead the homes get demolished. Shrink Wrapping Homes

An alternative to demolition has recently come into play from a Reno based company called Fast Wrap who specializes in shrink wrapping large items like boats, sheds, and huge piles of lumber are now doing the same to houses and big condo buildings, Shrink Wrapping Homes. According to Nick Timiraos of the Wall Street Journal who recently wrote an article on Fast Wrap, the shrink wrap “covers the unfinished structure in a thin sheet of plastic, sealing off buildings from exposure to the corroding effects of weather or to keep out unwelcome critters or squatters. ‘It looks like a plastic house,’ franchise operator Mike Enos tells the Real Deal. ‘When we put them in neighborhoods, everybody wants to keep them, not only their kids out of neighboring residences, but anybody else that might come in to steal or salvage, like for copper.'”


Sounds like a hell of an idea. I can’t imagine it’s THAT effective in keeping out a determined squatter with a blade, but for everything else, it might just work great. So far Fast Wrap has been doing jobs in the Northeast. After all, there is more severe weather out there, but I have to imagine if this tactic proves successful, we’ll be seeing similar home wrapping make its way to California soon.

By Andrew Brentan

22 thoughts on “Shrink Wrapping Homes”

  1. They look so weird! Ive never heard of that. They will defiently keep the elements out but i think animals and people could get in if they are determined enough.

  2. Wow. Now I have seen it all. We had a farm house in the panhandle of Texas that set vacant all but four or five weeks out of the year. Man did it deteriorate in a hurry. Amazing how quickly they go when no one is around to keep them up. Any idea what this process costs ?

  3. That is a genius idea for fighting the rodent and element exposure! Though I do have to agree that a determined squatter would still get in unless the plastic is extraordinarily strong or thick. I hope we end up not having to see too many homes wrapped up, but if they have to sit there empty, that is a far better alternative!

  4. I wonder how long it would be before the HOA starts to complain about the wrapping eyesore? In everything there are pitfalls. Time will tell if this becomes a viable alternative to damage from rodents and robbers.

  5. change your life

    First, this is a great site. Second, about your article, it was really interesting! I never thought you could wrap up a house! Thanks

    change your life’s last blog post..Change Your Life: Manage Stress

  6. Wow I have seen it all now! The sad part is about human beings, if they want in, they are going to get in. Sure it is going to slow then down, but they will get in. It is so very sad what we have to deal with now days.

  7. Betty Saenz Austin,TX REALTOR

    Wow! Now that is something I have not heard of yet!! Yes, I’ve seen some bad homes. Homes I do not want to touch anything in and want to wash and sanitize my hands when I leave!! Dead squirrels in nasty, dirty swimming pools, 1/2 build homes deteriorating in the weather. Maybe shrink wrap would halp!!

  8. Buenos Aires real estate

    This was really a agreat idea! now, how afordable is it? it has to be economic if not it would not work, some items are cheap so it should woth to spent the money buying it.

    Buenos Aires real estate’s last blog post..Punta del Este – Seaside Luxury Property

  9. Make Solar Panels

    The same problem is being faced every where by many lenders. The property that continues to lie useless and non-performing becomes a liability for the lenders. The better option is to dispose of that property by auction or through expediting REO sale process as soon as possible.

    Make Solar Panels’s last blog post..How to Make Solar Panels

  10. killer site for great information. so strange, yet so practical, it seems that we are shrink wrapping everything these days,

  11. Yes, that is really terrible. I had the opportunity to see a house that no one is held. The pool was green and it looked really scary.

  12. Make Solar Panels

    this is what we call artistry at the time of recession… i think people will look forward to it…because they want to be geared for the another recession period of the future

  13. Austin Real Estate Guy

    Seems to me this would be a smart thing to do before transporting a modular home too.

  14. Home Improvement Tools

    I have not seen this before, and perhaps the home wrapping could be seen in california soon? I wonder how people could sale a home that is wrapped in plastic?
    .-= Home Improvement Tools´s last blog ..Rockwell RK9000 Jawhorse =-.

  15. Rubbermaid Vertical Storage Shed

    Not a bad idea, i would have never thought of this myself. Also, I think this is a great alternative to demolition for a home.

  16. Well I’m not sure if this is a good idea or not. I think if a house is at risk for infestation or squatters and the elements then it’s probably a good thing. Definitely better than nothing. Its a good short term solution for sure. However I wouldn’t really like seeing it in my neighborhood.

  17. This is a good idea compared to leaving the property open to everyone. At least with the shrink wrap, there is a sense of security.

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